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It wasn’t too many years ago that pain was often misunderstood or ignored in the Long Term Care Facility geriatric population and especially in those residents with cognitive impairment who could not verbally express the level of pain they were in. Unrelieved pain often causes residents to have behavioral changes such as resisting care, pacing, depression, negative verbalizations, facial expressions, and self-harm. It has significant consequences in the areas of function as pain causes a decrease in ability to perform activities of daily living. It leads to sleep deprivation, which can decrease pain thresholds, limit the amount of daytime energy and increase the incidence and severity of depression and mood or behavioral disturbances. Pain can cause changes in walking, skin color, vital signs, and appetite.

Now though pain management is under intense scrutiny in the CMS survey process in Long Term Care Facilities. F-tag 309 provides extensive pain management guidance and investigative protocols for Nursing Home Surveyors to follow.

Facilities must recognize and manage pain in residents in order to help each resident attain or maintain the highest practicable level of well-being for that resident. In order to accomplish that each facility must, to the extent possible, recognize when the resident is experiencing pain and identify circumstances when pain can be anticipated; evaluate the existing pain and the cause(s), and manage or prevent pain, consistent with the comprehensive assessment and plan of care developed for that resident, current clinical standards of practice, and the resident’s goals and preferences.

The guidance basically states that nursing facilities must assess and address pain in all residents, including the cognitively impaired. The guidance gives surveyors new direction to cite facilities that do not adequately manage pain with deficiencies. The guidance to surveyors at F309 helps the Nursing Home and Hospital Surveyor to determine if the facility is fulfilling these requirements in regards to pain management in the residents of that healthcare facility.

We will continue more about pain in the next installment of Pain Management in the Nursing Home. Meanwhile – Keep safe and be your own advocate in the healthcare world!

JL

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One Response to “Pain Management in the Long Term Care Facility – Part I”

  1. Diane @ Me, Him And The Cats Says:

    So many times people think that because people look ok, that they are not in pain. There are so many conditions like fibromyalgia where you can’t tell how bad the person feels!

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